Jun
25
8:00 PM20:00

CARNEGIE HILL CONCERTS PRESENTS CHAMBER MUSIC BY RAMIN HEYDARBEYGI

Free Admission (suggested donation: $20 | $10 students & seniors)


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Carnegie Hill Concerts presents Chamber Music by Ramin Heydarbeygi performed by the Carnegie Hill Concerts Chamber Players at Church of the Advent Hope.

Carnegie Hill Concerts Chamber Players:

Christina Kay, Soprano

Conrad Harris, Violin

Pauline Kim Harris, Violin

Dana Kelley, Viola

Michael Haas, Cello

Stephen Gosling, Piano

Program:

String Quartet No. 2

WP 2017

Gefangene, Musik hörend

(after Käthe Kollwitz)

for two violins

WP 2019

Setayesh az Anahid

for string trio

2008

(revised version)

Avaz hay Nima

for voice and viola

2011/2019

Astvihad

for soprano and piano

2012

Rok-ku no haiku

2004/2019

for violin and piano

Program Notes:

The title of my song cycle, Astvihad (2012), in Old Persian, refers to the demon of death. I have used a number of poems that relate directly or indirectly to this subject. The collection of poems used for this song cycle are from the 9th century to present by Hafez, Sanai, Rudaki, Khoi, and Khaiyam. Astvihad was commissioned by Dr. Faustus for the “New Art Songs Project 2012,” and premiered on 8 May 2012 at WMP Concert Hall, New York, by Mary Hubbell, soprano, and Mirna Lekic, piano.

For many years I have been fascinated by the poetry of Nima, the father of modern Persian poetry. For me, his poems are musical, with distinct characters; however, once translated to other languages, these distinctions are lost. In many of his poems, including the three I have chosen for this cycle, there is an underlying dark, melancholic tone, which, in this case, unifies the selected poems. Avaz hay Nima (2009, rev 2019) was premiered by H. Roz Woll, voice, and William Hakim, viola, on 20 May 2009 at Elebash Concert Hall, New York. This performance marks the premiere of the revised version.

Gefangene, Musik hörend (after Käthe Kollwitz) (2019) centers on the notions of loss and memory. The title is based a work by German expressionist artist Käthe Kollwitz. Remembering what is lost when only its illusion exists in our memory or dreams is the central idea of this work. The musical element that represents the past is quotations and references made to JS Bach’s Sonata No. 3 for Solo Violin, at times latently. For this piece, I have suggested two performance versions, one is with inclusion of the first movement of Bach’s Sonata. This marks the first performance of this work.

Rok-ku no Haiku (2004-05, rev 2019) is in six movements, each movements expresses a different emotion. Despite the fact that there is a reference to Haiku in the title, this work, similar to my other works, should be viewed as Persian miniatures, an artistic expression found in classical poetry book illustration, as well as in poetic structures found rubai (or rubaiyat). Rok-ku no Haiku was first performed by Pauline Kim-Harris, violin, and Eric Huebner, piano, on 2 June 2005 at CAMI Hall, New York. This performance marks the premiere of the revised version.

Anahid, Anahita, Ab-Nahid, or Nahid, a Zoroastrian yazata, is an Iranian divinity, the one who “possesses waters,” and is the “mother of all knowledge,” and is celebrated in Aban Yasht, the longest of the Avestan hymns, verses from her hymn form the greater part of the Āban Niyayesh. Anahid was worshipped at many natural sanctuaries throughout Iranian territory. An Anahid temple, next to Shapur I’s palace at Bishapur, could be flooded with water, where Anahid was worshiped. This water-goddess and mother-goddess, responsible for life, was royally promoted and became widely popular. Artaxerxes II (404-359 B.C.) invoked Anahita, after Ahura Mazda and Mithra, and he encouraged her worship. Anahita has been a prominent figure in artistic representation and figures mainly in Zoroastrian literature. Setayesh az Anahid is a tribute to Nahid Jenabzadeh. The original version of this work was premiered by members of the Barbad Chamber Orchestra, Cyrus Beroukhim, violin, Miranda Sielaff, viola, and Arash Amini, violoncello, on 28 April 2010 at Steinway Reformed Church in Astoria, New York. This performance marks the premiere of the revised version.

String Quartet No. 2 (2017) consists of seven movements. In this work, a series of gestures in each movement leads to final movement, which is built as a strong closing gesture. This gesture brings the piece to a close in unison on a single note.


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Ramin Heydarbeygi, Composer

Critics have described Ramin Heydarbeygi’s music as “rich and expressive” and “honest, direct and uncompromising”, and with “unique artistic voice . . . well crafted, probing, and rich in content.”  His music has been performed in Iran and throughout the US, and featured at international music festivals, including the Silk Road Modern, Icebreaker III Festival, Festival of Modern Music, and Composers Now Festival; and by Ensemble 365, the Cygnus Ensemble, the Seattle Chamber Players, Dr. Faustus Project, Anti-Depressant, the Bronx Arts Ensemble, the Transit, among others, and in such venues as Carnegie Hall, Le Poisson Rouge, Benaroya Hall in Seattle, and the New York Botanical Garden.

Recent commissions have included from the Dr. Faustus Project, the Next Stage, New York State Council on the Arts, and the Seattle Chamber Players.  He studied composition with Bruce Saylor, Leo Kraft, Thea Musgrave, and Paul Cooper, was previously a resident composer with the Next Stage Ensemble in New York, and the founding music director and conductor of the Barbad Chamber Orchestra.  With the Barbad Chamber Orchestra he has conducted a wide range of music from historically informed performances of the baroque to numerous world, US, and New York premieres by contemporary composers from around world.


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Stephen Gosling, Piano

Stephen Gosling earned his Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctoral degrees at Juilliard, where he was awarded the Mennin Prize and Sony Elevated Standards Fellowship. He is a member of New York New Music Ensemble and Talea Ensemble, as well as a pianist at New York City Ballet. He has also performed with the New York Philharmonic (most notably as soloist in Messiaen’s Sept Haikaï), Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Orpheus, Orchestra of St. Luke’s, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, Eighth Blackbird, American Composers Orchestra and Chamber Orchestra of Europe, among many others.


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Christina Kay, Soprano

Soprano Christina Kay is a versatile singer with a particular enthusiasm for early and contemporary music. She was recently seen as Daphne in David Chesky’s new satirical opera, La Farranucci, and as Lead Singer in Petr Kotik’s chamber opera, Master-Pieces, for which she was praised for portraying a “vital, intelligent, generous and deeply rewarding” Gertrude Stein. In May 2019, Christina sang the premiere of Hannah Selin’s Six Narratives with the Brooklyn Metro Chamber Orchestra, a piece written for six female soloists with text by Adrienne Rich. An active soloist and chorister, she has sung with many professional groups, including ARTEK, The American Classical Orchestra, and True Concord Voices and Orchestra. She enjoys her weekly position at Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church and is active as a voice teacher and arts administrator in the NYC-area. 


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Conrad Harris, Violin

Violinist Conrad Harris has performed at Ostrava Days, Darmstadt Ferrienkürse für Neue Musik, Gulbenkian Encounters of New Music, Radio France, Warsaw Autumn, and NY Sonic Boom Festival. He is member of the FLUX Quartet and violin duo String Noise, concertmaster/soloist with the S.E.M. Orchestra, Ostravská Banda, STX Ensemble, Wordless Music Orchestra and Ensemble LPR. He has performed and recorded with Elliott Sharp, Robert Ashley, Alvin Lucier, David Behrman, "Blue" Gene Tyranny, Jean-Claude Risset, Rohan de Saram and Tiny Tim. A recording of the sonatas of Lejaren Hiller was released in 2018 with pianist Joe Kubera on New World Records. Harris has also recorded for Lovely, Mode, Asphodel, Vandenburg, CRI, Northern Spy, and Vinyl Retentive Records.


Pauline Kim Harris, Violin

Pauline Kim Harris is a violinist and composer, prolific in the classical to the experimental/avant-garde. A frequent guest with New York City’s leading new music ensembles, she has also toured internationally with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra. Pauline serves as Music Director of the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company and has performed as violin soloist for choreographer Pam Tanowitz and David Parker of The Bang Group. As a curator, she co-produced Drawing Sounds II, with husband, Conrad Harris at the Drawing Center, Petr Kotik @75 at (le) poisson rouge and continues as co-curator of Carnegie Hill Concerts, a chamber music series committed to new music. Her violin duo, String Noise released their freshman album “The Book of Strange Positions” on Northern Spy Records in 2015 and can also be heard on Dymaxion Groove Records, Cold Blue Music and more. Pauline has discovered an equal passion for composing as performing and is thrilled to be a resident fellow this spring at the Atlantic Center for the Arts. Commissioned by the St. George’s Choral Society her piece for organ, choir, cello and soprano, “When We Were” was premiered in 2016. She is currently making a new work for String Noise and Syrinx (acoustic synthesizer) "100 Thimbles in a Box" to be premiered on the Interpretations Series at Roulette on June 6, which will also include new works for String Noise by Sam Yulsman, Jessie Cox and George Lewis. A collection of even more new works will be presented July 9-13 on her first residency at The Stone and look out for her debut solo album on Sono Luminus Label later this summer. Fun fact: Pauline was in the final masterclass of Jascha Heifetz.


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Dana Kelley, Viola

Violist Dana Kelley has been a top prizewinner in the Sphinx Music Competition and the Irving M. Klein International String Competition. She is a member of the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, and recently completed an Artist Diploma in String Quartet Studies from the Juilliard School as a member of the Argus Quartet. The Argus Quartet was named the First Prize Winners of both of the 2017 M-Prize Chamber Arts Competition, the 2017 Concert Artists Guild Victor Elmaleh Competition and were recipients of the 2018 Classical Recording Foundation Award and the 2018 Salon de Virtuosi Award. Dana was a 2014-2016 Fellow in Ensemble Connect - a performance and teaching program of Carnegie Hall, The Juilliard School, and The Weill Music Institute. She received her Bachelor’s of Music from the Blair School of Music at Vanderbilt University, studying violin with Cornelia Heard and viola with Kathryn Plummer, and completed her Master’s of Music degree at the New England Conservatory as a student of Kim Kashkashian. Dana has collaborated with artists such as Ralph Kirshbaum, Nobuko Imai, and Miriam Fried, and participated in Ravinia’s Steans Musicians on Tour.  She frequently performs with The Metropolitan Opera Orchestra, A Far Cry, and The Knights chamber orchestras. She has attended festivals such as Ravinia’s Steans Music Institute, the Lucerne Academy, the International Summer Academy of the mdw – University of Music and Performing Arts Vienna, the Schiermonnikoog International Chamber Music Festival, Kneisel Hall, and the Aspen Music Festival and School. 


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Michael Haas, Cello

Hailed as a “sterling musician” by the Washington Post, cellist Michael Haas has performed for audiences in New York and around the world. As a member of the acclaimed Momenta Quartet he has premiered works by over 100 living composers and performed internationally at the Cervantino Festival, Ostrava Days Festival, Bolivia’s Instituto Laredo, and at Salihara in Jakarta. He can be seen in New York with a wide range of ensembles, including the American Symphony, Ensemble Échappé, Mark Morris Dance Group, Argento Chamber Ensemble, and Trinity Wall Street's NOVUS NY. Mr. Haas holds degrees from the Curtis Institute of Music and Juilliard School.

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May
28
8:00 PM20:00

Copy of Carnegie Hill Concerts presents music by Catherine Lamb feat. Carnegie Hill Concerts Chamber Players

Free Admission (suggested donation: $20 | $10 students & seniors)


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Carnegie Hill Concerts presents music by Catherine Lamb feat. Carnegie Hill Concerts Chamber Players:

Conrad Harris, Violin

Joshua Modney, Violin

Eric Wubbels, Piano

PROGRAM:

in (tone) for Two Violins (2012)

Prisma Interius VII for Violin and Synthesizer (NY Premiere) (2018)

in (tone) (2012) was written during a phase of trying to comprehend, or discover, overlays or saturations of similar qualities in harmonic colorations. Searching for the moments where monochromatic points of brilliant intensities drift into after-images and resultant vibrations of the other by taking simplified and otherwise very activated and sympathetic resonances around multiples of 3 and unisons, displacing them towards their extremes by their close proximities sounding together, compressed.  All the possible saturations of yellow and white together in one space, perhaps, with a slight shift into orange.

Prisma Interius VII (2018), commissioned by Hellqvist/Amaral duo, comes from a series of nine pieces exploring the role of the secondary rainbow synthesizer, a keyboard instrument that is placing resonant band pass filters with high Qs on whatever the microphones just outside of the listening space are capturing. In each piece the role changes slightly. While mostly the pieces are exploring its bridging potential between the harmonic space made clear by the main voices and the surrounding environment (highlighting or basso continuo instrument), in VII it becomes an actual duo between violin and synthesizer, each phrase an unfurling form as one color shifting into another, and its smeared residue.

The intention is to narrow the (our own) filters and to approach a kind of thread that could have a feeling of an infinite space. from one inner point of listening, being very individual and personal—from that point one could listen with the others into the outer atmosphere and see the connectivity of everything. that’s ideal. that’s what i am trying to find, that space. what is the limit of connectivity from one point to the absolute, outside…


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Violinist Conrad Harris has performed new works for violin at Ostrava Days, Darmstadt Ferrienkürse für Neue Musik, Gulbenkian Encounters of New Muisic, Radio France, Warsaw Autumn, and New York’s Sonic Boom Festival. In addition to being a member of the FLUX Quartet, he is concertmaster/soloist with the S.E.M Ensemble, Ostravská Banda, and STX Ensemble. He has performed and recorded with such artists as Elliott Sharp, "Blue" Gene Tyranny, Jean-Clause Risset, Rohan de Saram, and Tiny Tim. A solo CD featuring premiers by Alvin Lucier, David Behrman, Robert Ashley and Gordon Mumma will soon be released on Mode Records. He has also recorded for Asphodel, Vandenburg, CRI, and Vinyl Retentive Records.


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Eric Wubbels is a composer and pianist, and a Co-Director of the Wet Ink Ensemble. His music has been performed throughout Europe, Asia, Australia, and the U.S., by groups such as Wet Ink Ensemble, Mivos Quartet, yarn|wire, Splinter Reeds, Kupka's Piano (AUS), SCENATET (DK), Hong Kong New Music Ensemble, and featured on festivals including Huddersfield Festival, Chicago Symphony MusicNOW, New York Philharmonic CONTACT, MATA Festival, and Zurich Tage für Neue Musik.

As a performer, he has given U.S. and world premieres of works by major figures such as Peter Ablinger, Richard Barrett, Beat Furrer, George Lewis, and Mathias Spahlinger, as well as vital young artists such as Rick Burkhardt, Francesco Filidei, Erin Gee, Bryn Harrison, Clara Iannotta, Darius Jones, Cat Lamb, Ingrid Laubrock, Charmaine Lee, Alex Mincek, Sam Pluta, Katharina Rosenberger, and Kate Soper.

He has recorded for Carrier Records, hatART, Intakt, New Focus, Spektral (Vienna),  quiet design, and Albany Records, among others, and has held teaching positions at Amherst College and Oberlin Conservatory.


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Josh Modney is a violinist devoted to creative musicmaking. A “new-music luminary,” “superb violinist” (The New York Times), and “multitasking virtuoso” (The New Yorker) hailed for “jaw-dropping technical skill…” and as “one of today’s most intrepid experimentalists” (Bandcamp Daily), Modney collaborates with a wide array of renowned ensembles and artists as part of a broad scene of adventurous music that thrives at the nexus of composition, improvisation, and interpretation.

Modney is violinist and Executive Director of the Wet Ink Ensemble and a member of the International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), and performed with the Mivos Quartet for eight years, a vital new-music string quartet he co-founded in 2008.

Modney’s playing has been featured on a wide variety of outstanding recordings, including titles on Carrier Records, Deutsche Grammophon, Sound American, hat[now]ART, Nonesuch, and Tzadik Records. Modney’s 2017 release of improvised chamber music with guitarist Patrick Higgins (ZS), EVRLY MVSIC (NNA Tapes), earned praise for its “clairvoyant connection and sheer instrumental prowess” (The Quietus), and his 2018 triple-CD debut solo release, Engage (New Focus Recordings) was lauded by The New York Times as “one of the most intriguing programs of the year”.


Catherine Lamb (b. 1982, Olympia, Wa, U.S.), is a composer exploring the interaction of elemental tonal material and the variations in presence between shades and beings in a room. She has been studying and composing music since a young age. In 2003 she turned away from the conservatory in an attempt to understand the structures and intonations within Hindustani Classical Music, later finding Mani Kaul in 2006 who was directly connected to Zia Mohiuddin Dagar and whose philosophical approach to sound became important to her. She studied (experimental) composition at the California Institute of the Arts (2004-2006) under James Tenney and Michael Pisaro, who were both integral influences. It was there also that she began her work into rational Harmonic Space, which became a clear way to investigate the interaction of tones and ever-fluctuating shapes, where these interactions in and of them-selves became structural elements in her work. Since then she has written various ensemble pieces (at times with liminal electronic portions) and continues to go further into elemental territories, through various kinds of research, collaboration, and practice (herself as a violist). She received her MFA from the Milton Avery School of Fine Arts at Bard College in 2012 and is currently residing in Berlin, Germany.

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Mar
26
8:00 PM20:00

Carnegie Hill Concerts Chamber Players

Free Admission (suggested donation: $20 | $10 students & seniors)


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Carnegie Hill Concerts Chamber Players join composer, vocalist and multi-instrumentalist, Toby Driver, in an evening of innovative and virtuosic twenty-first-century chamber music, presenting a the full set of compositions from Toby Driver’s most recent album, They Are the Shield.

Carnegie Hill Concerts Chamber Players:

Brian Chase, drums

Will Healy, piano

Conrad Harris, violin

Pauline Kim Harris, violin

Program:

Anamnesis Park

Glyph

470 Nanometers

Scaffold of Digital Snow

Smoke-Scented Mycelium

The Knot

Boys on the Hill (from last record)

Eptaceros (from first solo record)

Read what Sputnik has to say about “They Are the Shield”—now ranked as the #1 album of the year in every genre via one of the largest online ratings sites:

“Toby Driver of maudlin of the Well and Kayo Dot (along with a slew of other projects) released his first solo album in over a decade just last year. What the excellent Madonnawhore began was a new dimension to the versatile songwriter’s avant-garde and forward-thinking music. It consisted of ghostly songs and a stripped down instrumental line-up, possessing a level of intimacy that was previously unexplored by Driver. His first solo album in over a decade could be considered his most straightforward release by embodying a consistent tone and style from beginning to end, which maudlin of the Well and Kayo Dot have avoided. They Are the Shieldexpands on the wistfulness of its predecessor for more complex and dynamic songwriting. Unique soundscapes come alive through an interplay of violins and sublime ambiance, particularly in album opener "Anamnesis Park." Nearly six minutes go by before the singing and main groove of the song even begins, but the violin and keyboard centric intro is so captivating and well-structured that it feels completely natural.

The unconventional writing Driver is known for is at its strongest here, as it is in the best work by maudlin of the Well and Kayo Dot. Violins, guitars, and keyboards drift in and out of playing solo or layered together in a uniquely beautiful way. “Glyph” is a lush, sorrowful piece featuring one of Driver’s most impressive vocal performances. The track crescendos with a cinematic slow dance between achingly gorgeous violins and atmospheric guitar tones. Some moments on the first half sound faintly influenced by early Godspeed You! Black Emperor and later-day Talk Talk in rewarding fashion. “470 Nanometers” is a more energetic piece and an album highlight, reminiscent of the maudlin of the Well reunion album Part the Second, with dazzling guitar and violin playing and grooving drums.

While retaining focus, They Are the Shield is able to explore a wide range of dynamics, from unsettling ambient sections to uptempo passages of a kind of undefined middle ground between chamber music and post-rock. Driver lets the influences of contemporary experimental groups and composers like Ulver and Max Richter seep in while making something wholly original. “Scaffold of Digital Snow” possesses a kind of mystique as it begins with solo violin and guitar chords, then transitions to a soaring middle section of stunning string arrangements with singing by Bridget Bellavia, the multi-talented collaborator with Driver on their dark electronic music project Piggy Black Cross. “The Knot” is an ambient ballad that closes the album on an emotional note, as the track builds to a stunning climax that shows the range of Driver’s singing voice and an ethereal blend of piano, violin, and synth tones.

They Are the Shield does what any musical successor should do, by evolving from what came before. Madonnawhore was great in its own right, and what Toby Driver has made here is even more expansive and cinematic, with an unpredictable nature somewhat reminiscent of his other projects. As elegant and alluring as the record sounds, it is not without unsettling and strange moments as well, particularly in the eerie “Smoke-Scented Mycelium.” Each listener will glean something different from the album, including the abstract and mysterious lyrics. Toby Driver continues to prove that he’s an uncompromising artist, obviously not averse to trying new musical ideas but remaining focused on the emotional impact and beauty of what a piece can express. They Are the Shield finds Toby Driver continuing to evolve as a solo artist, with masterful string arrangements and gorgeous atmospheres for one of the finest albums of the year.”


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Everything is fluid, the only constant is change, you can't step in the same river twice. Many people hold these truths to be self-evident, and as these ideas become even more more commonplace, it only makes sense that musicians should defy the demand to answer the question "Who are you?" The refusal to answer is, in a way, the best answer possible. Toby Driver's music is what that refusal sounds like.

Having grown up in the Northeast US, surrounded by a confusing combination of progressive social values and religious upbringing, haunted history's abandoned places and nowhere to stop the car even just to take a look, Driver developed an adventurous mind fascinated with exploration, rule breaking, and the unknown. Music was present since birth, through his parents' LP collection, and became a study at age eight following in his older brother's footsteps, whose mere 11-month age difference led to literally everything being shared. It was perhaps here that Driver's urge to discover his own self was stoked.

He studied composition at the experimental school, Hampshire College, with the jazz legend Yusef Lateef, whose unorthodox and innovative artistic practices encouraged Driver's search to become even more vigorous, and he developed a style characterized by imposing architecture and a distinct approach to time, focusing on ensemble performances of grand conducted phrases and impressionistic pulse, strongly influenced by Lateef's sense of harmony–ideas which he later compressed into virtuosic and complex rhythmic counterpoint. Whereas most musicians identify themselves by their chosen genre, Driver's rejection of idioms has resulted in a vast, unpredictable discography full of risks and liberties that invokes influences from every age and place while never settling on one palette of colors, and a career that has brought his music to a considerable breadth of venues, from thousands-capacity metal festivals to classical concert halls, and from basement concerts to the 57th Biennale di Venezia. It is in retrospect then, where the fullest picture of Driver's mission comes into focus: the navigation of his own identity and purpose, the discovery of which aspects are fluid and which are inescapable, and the sustained repetitive insistence of a person's voice and personality passing through environments and time.

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Brian Chase is a drummer and composer living in Brooklyn. His diverse range of work includes that with Grammy nominated rock band Yeah Yeah Yeahs, the community of the New York experimental music scene, and Drums and Drones, an electroacoustic project focusing on the application of the just intonation tuning system to drums and percussion. Performances have taken him across the world to such notable stages as the Sydney Opera House, Reading and Leeds Festivals, and Metropolitan Museum of Art. Counted among these are innumerable DIY and independent art spaces of music’s “underground” communities. Recorded works include several with Yeah Yeah Yeahs and many albums with leading improvisors. In 2018, Brian released Drums and Drones: Decade, a triple album with 144 page book, covering the first ten years of Drums and Drones. This album was the debut release on his own label, Chaikin Records, which was followed by a duo album with saxophonist Catherine Sikora. As an educator, Brian was a visiting professor at Bennington College and guest lecturer at So Percussion’s Summer Institute at Princeton University. Writings have appeared in John Zorn’s Arcana, Modern Drummer Magazine, and Talkhouse. Performer and artist residencies have been held at The Stone and Headlands Center for the Arts. Away from the drums, Brian is a regular practitioner of Ashtanga Yoga.

www.chasebrian.com | www.chaikinrecords.com

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Will Healy is a composer and pianist based in New York. Noted for his "lushly bluesy" sound and "adroitly blended... textures" (New York Times), he is the artistic director of ShoutHouse, a collective of hip-hop, jazz, and classical musicians. After playing trumpet in an Afrobeat band for a few years, he grew interested in collaborating with performers from many corners of the New York music scene. In addition, he is an accomplished pianist specializing in Bach, with a repertoire that includes the complete Goldberg Variations and WTC Book 1. Healy was the recipient of the Richard Rodgers Scholarship at The Juilliard School, where he studied with John Corigliano, Steven Stucky, and Samuel Adler. He has also studied with Kevin Puts, Harold Meltzer, and Richard Wilson.

Recent awards include a 2017 Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, an ASCAP Morton Gould Award, the W.K. Rose Fellowship, a JFund commission from the American Composers Forum, and prizes in the Juilliard and Kaleidoscope Orchestra Composition Competitions. He was the recipient of the Aaron Copland Prize from the Bogliasco Foundation in 2018, and has been a fellow at the Aspen Music Festival, Minnesota Orchestra Composers Institute, and the L.A. Phil’s National Composers Intensive. Healy’s work has appeared at The Kennedy Center, Lincoln Center, The Apollo, on the NY Philharmonic’s Biennial series, on "New Sounds" with John Schaefer (WNYC) and "Making Music" (WBAI), and more. He studied piano for many years with Dennis Malone at the Crestwood Music School.

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Violinist Conrad Harris has performed new works for violin at Ostrava Days, Darmstadt Ferrienkürse für Neue Musik, Gulbenkian Encounters of New Muisic, Radio France, Warsaw Autumn, and New York’s Sonic Boom Festival. In addition to being a member of the FLUX Quartet, he is concertmaster/soloist with the S.E.M Ensemble, Ostravská Banda, and STX Ensemble. He has performed and recorded with such artists as Elliott Sharp, "Blue" Gene Tyranny, Jean-Clause Risset, Rohan de Saram, and Tiny Tim. A solo CD featuring premiers by Alvin Lucier, David Behrman, Robert Ashley and Gordon Mumma will soon be released on Mode Records. He has also recorded for Asphodel, Vandenburg, CRI, and Vinyl Retentive Records.

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Pauline Kim Harris is a violinist and composer, prolific in the classical to the experimental/avant-garde. A frequent guest with New York City’s leading new music ensembles, she has also toured internationally with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra. Pauline serves as Music Director of the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company and has performed as violin soloist for choreographer Pam Tanowitz and David Parker of The Bang Group. As a curator, she co-produced Drawing Sounds II, with husband, Conrad Harris at the Drawing Center, Petr Kotik @75 at (le) poisson rouge and continues as co-curator of Carnegie Hill Concerts, a chamber music series committed to new music. Her violin duo, String Noise released their freshman album The Book of Strange Positions on Northern Spy Records in 2015 and can also be heard on Dymaxion Groove Records, Cold Blue Music and more. Pauline has discovered an equal passion for composing as performing and is thrilled to be a resident fellow this spring at the Atlantic Center for the Arts. Commissioned by the St. George’s Choral Society her piece for organ, choir, cello and soprano, “When We Were” was premiered in 2016. She is currently making a new work for String Noise and Syrinx (acoustic synthesizer) "100 Thimbles in a Box" to be premiered on the Interpretations Series at Roulette on June 6, which will also include new works for String Noise by Sam Yulsman, Jessie Cox and George Lewis. A collection of even more new works will be presented July 9-13 on her first residency at The Stone and look out for her debut solo album on Sono Luminus Label later this summer. Fun fact: Pauline was in the final masterclass of Jascha Heifetz.

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Carnegie Hill Concerts Chamber Players
Feb
26
8:00 PM20:00

Carnegie Hill Concerts Chamber Players

Free Admission (suggested donation: $20 | $10 students & seniors)


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21st-Century Chamber Music: Virtuosity and Innovation in Composition and Performance

This first concert of 2019 both draws on Carnegie Hill Concerts’ history and looks toward the future. The Carnegie Hill Concerts Chamber Players will present works by some of the outstanding composers whose compositions have been featured in previous seasons. And all donations will go to funding the remainder of this season, during which each concert will focus on works by a single living composers not yet highlighted in the series.

Carnegie Hill Concerts Chamber Players:

Stephen Gosling, Piano

Alex Cohen, Double Kick Bass Drum

Conrad Harris, Violin

Pauline Kim Harris, Violin

Ling Ling Huang, Violin

Kallie Ciechomski, Viola

Mariel Roberts, Cello

The Bang Group:

David Parker, Tap Shoes

Jeff Kazin, Tap Shoes

Tommy Seibold, Tap Shoes

Nic Petry, Tap/Pointe Shoes

Amber Sloan, Pointe/Tap Shoes

Louise Benkelman, Pointe Shoes

PROGRAM:

David Lang: Illumination Rounds for Violin and Piano (1981)

Conrad Harris, Violin

Stephen Gosling, Piano

Will Healy: String Quartet Future Caprices (2017)

Pauline Kim Harris, Violin

Ling Ling Huang, Violin

Kallie Ciechomski, Viola

Mariel Roberts, Cello

Pauline Kim Harris: Sparkle for 10 Pointe and 8 Tap Shoes (2019)

The Bang Group:

David Parker, Tap Shoes

Jeff Kazin, Tap Shoes

Tommy Seibold, Tap Shoes

Nic Petry, Tap/Pointe Shoes

Amber Sloan, Pointe/Tap Shoes

Louise Benkelman, Pointe Shoes

Paula Matthusen: Violin Trio between moonlight and the smell of dust (2016)

Conrad Harris, Violin

Pauline Kim Harris, Violin

Ling Ling Huang, Violin

Richard Carrick: Natural Duo for Two Violins (1998) and Phosphene for Two Violins (2001)

Conrad Harris, Violin

Pauline Kim Harris, Violin

Molly Joyce: Shapeshifter for Violin and Electronics (2015)

Pauline Kim Harris, Violin + Electronics

James Ilgenfritz: Terminal Affirmative for Violin and Double Bass Kick Drum (2014)

Pauline Kim Harris, Violin

Alex Cohen, Double Kick Bass Drum


Musicians:

Alex Cohen has emerged as a prolific educator and drummer in the New York City music scene, working with artist as diverse as Mac Miller, death metal legends Malignancy and Pyrexia, and National Geographic.  Alex's endeavors have taken him all over the world, and he's also a featured educator in writer for Sick Drummer and Drumhead Magazines, as well as being an endorser for Paiste Cymbals, Trick Pedals, and Los Cabos Drumsticks.

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The Bang Group, a New York-based, rhythm-driven, contemporary dance troupe is directed by Jeffrey Kazin and choreographer David Parker.  TBG tours and performs widely throughout the United States and Europe as well as in regular seasons in New York City presented by Danspace Project, New York Live Arts (and its predecessor Dance Theater Workshop,) Dance Now NYC, Harkness Dance Festival, and The 92nd Street Y, among others.  Parker is a 2013 Guggenheim Fellow in choreography whose work straddles percussive and contemporary forms. Pauline Kim Harris' "Sparkle" is the first pure music piece the company has had written for them and composed expressly for their pointe and tap shod feet.

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Stephen Gosling earned his Bachelor’s, Master’s and Doctoral degrees at Juilliard, where he was awarded the Mennin Prize and Sony Elevated Standards Fellowship. He is a member of New York New Music Ensemble and Talea Ensemble, as well as a pianist at New York City Ballet. He has also performed with the New York Philharmonic (most notably as soloist in Messiaen’s Sept Haikaï), Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center, Orpheus, Orchestra of St. Luke’s, St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, Eighth Blackbird, American Composers Orchestra and Chamber Orchestra of Europe, among many others.

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Ling Ling Huang started violin at the age of 4 with her mother Lilan Z. Huang. She continued studying violin with Fredell Lack until her admission to the Cleveland Institute of Music at the age of 15. There, she won the concerto competition with Stravinsky Violin Concerto and the Milhaud Prize. Most recently, Ms. Huang performed the Britten Violin Concerto with the Shepherd School Symphony as a result of winning the Concerto Competition at Rice University’s Shepherd School of Music where she received an Artist Diploma with Paul Kantor. Ms. Huang currently lives in New York, freelancing and playing as a substitute violinist in ensembles including the New York Philharmonic, the Houston Symphony, and the Houston Grand Opera. In her free time, she enjoys writing on her website.

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Kallie Ciechomski performs regularly with International Contemporary Ensemble, New York City Ballet, Pittsburgh Symphony, New Jersey Symphony, New York City Opera, Talea Ensemble; and at Lion King and Dear Evan Hansen on Broadway.  She has also appeared with Ben Folds, Norah Jones, Ray Lamontagne, Snarky Puppy, Andrea Bocelli, and Stevie Wonder.

Feminist Counterpoint, Kallie’s solo project, champions music written in her lifetime by women, trans, and nonbinary composers.  Through this project, she amplifies underrepresented voices by commissioning new works, reinforcing the existing repertoire, and reaching new audiences through lecture/recital style installations in nontraditional venues.  Concerts have included a sold out performance at New Music Gathering, amplified recital in Times Square, concert/workshop at Girls Rock Camp, and two week West Coast tour. This year, she is focusing on new works for viola, electronics and projections with shows at Areté Gallery and Symphony Space.

Kallie’s 2018-2019 season includes recitals and masterclasses as guest artist of the Arthur Russell Festival for Creative Music Making, performances of traditional Cuban music as guest violist of Toomai Quintet, touring with Gyda Valtysdottir, and the release of Forrest Pierce’s string trio for New Focus Recordings.

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Violinist Conrad Harris has performed at Ostrava Days, Darmstadt Ferrienkürse für Neue Musik, Gulbenkian Encounters of New Music, Radio France, Warsaw Autumn, and NY Sonic Boom Festival. He is member of the FLUX Quartet and violin duo String Noise, concertmaster/soloist with the S.E.M. Orchestra, Ostravská Banda, STX Ensemble, Wordless Music Orchestra and Ensemble LPR. He has performed and recorded with Elliott Sharp, Robert Ashley, Alvin Lucier, David Behrman, "Blue" Gene Tyranny, Jean-Claude Risset, Rohan de Saram and Tiny Tim. A recording of the sonatas of Lejaren Hiller was released in 2018 with pianist Joe Kubera on New World Records. Harris has also recorded for Lovely, Mode, Asphodel, Vandenburg, CRI, Northern Spy, and Vinyl Retentive Records.

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“Trailblazing” cellist Mariel Roberts (Feast of Music) is widely recognized as a deeply dedicated interpreter of contemporary music. Recent performances have garnered praise for her “technical flair and exquisite sensitivity” (American Composers Forum), as well as her ability to “couple youthful vision with startling maturity”. (InDigest Magazine). Roberts' work emphasizes expanding the technical and expressive possibilities of her instrument through close relationships with innovative performers and composers of her generation. Her passion for collaboration and experimentation has led her to premiere hundreds of new works by both emerging and established artists.

Roberts has appeared as a soloist and chamber musician across four continents, most notably as a member of the Mivos Quartet, Wet Ink Ensemble, International Contemporary Ensemble, and Ensemble Signal. She performs regularly on major stages for new music such as the Lincoln Center Festival (NYC), Wien Modern (Austria), Lucerne Festival(Switzerland), Cervantino Festival (Mexico), Klang Festival (Denmark), Shanghai New Music Week (China), Darmstadt Internationalen Ferienkurse für Neue Musik (Germany), and Aldeburgh Music Festival (UK). Roberts has been featured as a chamber musician on recordings for Innova, Albany Records, New World Records, New Amsterdam, Carrier Records, New Focus, and Urtext Records.   

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Composers:

Paula Matthusen is a composer who writes both electroacoustic and acoustic music and realizes sound installations. She has written for diverse instrumentations, such as “run-on sentence of the pavement” for piano, ping-pong balls, and electronics, which Alex Ross of The New Yorker noted as being “entrancing”. Her work often considers discrepancies in musical space—real, imagined, and remembered. Awards include the Walter Hinrichsen Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, a Fulbright Grant, two ASCAP Morton Gould Young Composers’ Awards, and the 2014 - 2015 Elliott Carter Rome Prize. Matthusen is currently Associate Professor of Music at Wesleyan University and Chair of the Music Department.

between the smell of dust and moonlight is a multi-movement work that engages with the idea of the gradual evolution of space and the multiple roles it may serve. Written specifically for the Philips Collection and commissioned by the Metropolis Ensemble, the piece created different sites of musical activity that drew on the Phillips Collection's present incarnation as renowned art museum as well as the traces of its domestic past, as evidenced by it unique doorways and fireplaces. The second movement of this work, the violin trio, was one such site marking musical activity within this work. The title is drawn from Don Hertzfeldt's film It's Such a Beautiful Day.

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David Lang is one of the most highly esteemed and performed American composers writing today. His works have been performed around the world in most of the great concert halls.

Lang’s score for Paolo Sorrentino’s film Youth received Academy Award and Golden Globe nominations, among others.  Other recent work includes man made, a concerto for So Percussion and orchestra, co-commissioned by the Los Angeles Philharmonic and the BBC Symphony; his opera anatomy theater, written in collaboration with visual artist Mark Dion, at Los Angeles Opera; the public domain, a commission from Lincoln Center for 1000 amateur singers; and his opera the loser, based on the novel by Thomas Bernhard, which opened the 2016 Next Wave Festival at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, and for which Lang served as librettist, composer, and stage director.  His opera prisoner of the state, co-commissioned by the New York Philharmonic, Rotterdam's de Doelen Concert Hall, London’s Barbican Centre, Barcelona’s l’Auditori, Bochum Symphony Orchestra, and Bruges’s Concertgebouw, will premiere June 6-8, 2019 in New York, conducted by Jaap van Zweden.

Lang is a Professor of Music Composition at the Yale School of Music and is Artist in Residence at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton.  He is co-founder and co-artistic director of New York's legendary music collective Bang on a Can. His music is published by Red Poppy Music (ASCAP) and is distributed worldwide by G. Schirmer, Inc.

For violin and piano. "An illumination round is a type of bullet that was used extensively in Vietnam. This bullet, when fired, leaves a phosphorus trail hanging in the air, allowing machine gunners in helicopter gunships to aim more precisely. In my composition, the relationship between "bullet" and "shadow" has defined the roles of the violin and piano: the instruments trade off being either image or echo. In this way, a fierce counterpoint devolves from what are really just unison ideas."

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Pauline Kim Harris is a violinist and composer, prolific in the classical to the experimental/avant-garde. A frequent guest with New York City’s leading new music ensembles, she has also toured internationally with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra. Pauline serves as Music Director of the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company and has performed as violin soloist for choreographer Pam Tanowitz and David Parker of The Bang Group. As a curator, she co-produced Drawing Sounds II, with husband, Conrad Harris at the Drawing Center, Petr Kotik @75 at (le) poisson rouge and continues as co-curator of Carnegie Hill Concerts, a chamber music series committed to new music. Her violin duo, String Noise released their freshman album “The Book of Strange Positions” on Northern Spy Records in 2015 and can also be heard on Dymaxion Groove Records, Cold Blue Music and more. Pauline has discovered an equal passion for composing as performing and is thrilled to be a resident fellow this spring at the Atlantic Center for the Arts. Commissioned by the St. George’s Choral Society her piece for organ, choir, cello and soprano, “When We Were” was premiered in 2016. She is currently making a new work for String Noise and Syrinx (acoustic synthesizer) "100 Thimbles in a Box" to be premiered on the Interpretations Series at Roulette on June 6, which will also include new works for String Noise by Sam Yulsman, Jessie Cox and George Lewis. A collection of even more new works will be presented July 9-13 on her first residency at The Stone and look out for her debut solo album on Sono Luminus Label later this summer. Fun fact: Pauline was in the final masterclass of Jascha Heifetz.

Kim Harris first started thinking about tap and pointe shoes as instruments after being introduced to David Parker's percussive dance company, The Bang Group. In works by Steve Reich and Morton Feldman, the dancers take the role of musicians and play the score. In a piece by Dean Rosenthal, a violinist plays the score along with 3 dancers like chamber music.

"Sparkle" is the first purely musical piece the company has had written for them, composed expressly for pointe and tap.

Traditionally, the pointe shoe is not meant to be heard. In Sparkle, a single pair of pointe shoes determines the preliminary sound of the entire piece into which all others join, creating a multi-textural soundscape. In composing this work, a 12-tone scale for tap shoes and a 7-tone scale for pointe shoes were created. Through rhythmic variation, repetition, dynamics and canons, the piece unfolds in an abstract and provacative way, ending unexpectedly and emotionally.

Sparkle is dedicated to David Parker's 60th Birthday.

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 Composer, conductor and pianist Richard Carrick is a Guggenheim Fellow who writes music of spatial depth and robust stasis, described as "charming, with exoticism and sheer infectiousness" by The New York Times.  His music has been programmed and presented internationally at festivals including NYPHIL Biennial, ISCM World Music Days, Enescu Festival, by JACK Quartet, Tony Arnold and others, released on three critically acclaimed CD’s, and published by PSNY.  

Carrick is Chair of Composition at Berklee and co-founder of Either/Or, winner of the CMA/ASCAP Award for Adventuresome Programming. He has presented master classes and lectures throughout Europe, Israel, Rwanda, Japan and South Korea.  Born in Paris of French-Algerian and British descent, Carrick received his BA from Columbia University, PhD from the University of California-San Diego with Brian Ferneyhough, and pursued further studies at IRCAM and the Koninklijk Conservatorium in The Hague.  

Natural Duo begins with from a bizarre arrangement of the opening idea of the second section of my Natural Behaviour for solo percussion.

A phosphene is a phenomenon characterized by the experience of seeing light without light actually entering the eye. The word phosphene comes from the Greek words phos (light) and phainein (to show).

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Composer and bassist James Ilgenfritz, recognized in the New Yorker for his “characteristic magnanimity” and his “invaluable contributions to New York’s new-music community as a composer, improviser, collaborator, and organizer,” leads The Anagram Ensemble and performs regularly as a solo bassist. His trio Hypercolor (with Lukas Ligeti & Eyal Maoz) recently released their debut CD on John Zorn’s label Tzadik. James’s 2017 solo CD Origami Cosmos features works by Annie Gosfield, Miya Masaoka, Elliott Sharp, & JG Thirlwell, and his international jazz quartet MiND GAMeS released their second CD Ephemera Obscura on the Portuguese label Clean Feed in July 2017. In June 2018 James presented his second residency at John Zorn’s venue The Stone, now located at the New School’s Black Box Theater, featuring world premieres of Ilgenfritz compositions for the Momenta Quartet, flutist Margaret Lancaster, The New Thread Saxophone Quartet, and the Kathleen Supove/James Moore/Jennifer Choi trio, as well as works for solo contrabass by John King, Anthony Donofrio, and Lucie Vitkova. James has performed throughout the US, Canada, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Indonesia, Italy, Poland, and Switzerland. James’s notable performances include work with composer/improvisers Pauline Oliveros, Roscoe Mitchell, Rufus Reid, Anthony Braxton, “Blue” Gene Tyranny, and many others. James has received grants from New Music USA and American Composers Forum. He holds a BA in Music Performance from University of Michigan and MA in Contemporary Music Performance from UCSD, and directs the Suzuki bass program at Brooklyn Conservatory of Music.

The Roman poet Ovid described how dripping water hollows out stone, not through force but through persistence. Terminal Affirmative (2014) is a dialog between conceptuality and musicality, as the expansive melodic potential of the violin stands in stark contrast to the tightly focused expressive range of the double-pedal bass drum. Both parts are extremely virtuosic, but while the violinist's hands and fingers are very active, the hands of the percussionist are kept motionless, with all the force and persistence transferred to the percussionist's two feet. This redirected energy draws into sharp focus the persistence of repeating an action so many times that a permanent impression is driven into stone.

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Molly Joyce’s music has been described as one of “serene power” (New York Times), written to “superb effect” (The Wire), and “impassioned” (The Washington Post). Her works have been commissioned by ensembles including the New World, New York Youth, Pittsburgh, and Milwaukee Symphony Orchestras, and New Juilliard, Decoda, and Contemporaneous ensembles. Additionally, her work has been presented at TEDxMidAtlantic, Bang on a Can Marathon, Classical:NEXT, VisionIntoArt’s FERUS Festival, and featured in Pitchfork, WNYC’s New Sounds, Q2 Music, I Care If You Listen, and The Log Journal.

Molly has studied at The Juilliard School, Royal Conservatory in The Hague, and Yale School of Music.

Written in the winter of 2015 in The Hague, Netherlands, Shapeshifter is motivated by the concept of control and losing it. Composed for the duo of violinist Monica Germino and sound engineer Frank van der Weij, I was very intrigued that typically Frank is not seen visually, and therefore wanted to play with the idea of him controlling Monica’s sound and gradually letting go of that control. In addition, I wanted Monica to in her own way lose control of her playing and gradually “shapeshift” to a new and divergent sound.

Shapeshifter is also dedicated to the duo of Monica Germino and Frank van der Weij, who premiered it in April 2015 at Korzo Theater in The Hague, Netherlands. I have always admired them both from afar, and to write and work with them is truly a dream come true.

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Will Healy is a composer and pianist based in New York. Noted for his "lushly bluesy" sound and "adroitly blended... textures" (New York Times), he is the artistic director of ShoutHouse, a collective of hip-hop, jazz, and classical musicians. After playing trumpet in an Afrobeat band for a few years, he grew interested in collaborating with performers from many corners of the New York music scene. In addition, he is an accomplished pianist specializing in Bach, with a repertoire that includes the complete Goldberg Variations and WTC Book 1. Healy was the recipient of the Richard Rodgers Scholarship at The Juilliard School, where he studied with John Corigliano, Steven Stucky, and Samuel Adler. He has also studied with Kevin Puts, Harold Meltzer, and Richard Wilson.

Recent awards include a 2017 Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, an ASCAP Morton Gould Award, the W.K. Rose Fellowship, a JFund commission from the American Composers Forum, and prizes in the Juilliard and Kaleidoscope Orchestra Composition Competitions. He was the recipient of the Aaron Copland Prize from the Bogliasco Foundation in 2018, and has been a fellow at the Aspen Music Festival, Minnesota Orchestra Composers Institute, and the L.A. Phil’s National Composers Intensive. Healy’s work has appeared at The Kennedy Center, Lincoln Center, The Apollo, on the NY Philharmonic’s Biennial series, on "New Sounds" with John Schaefer (WNYC) and "Making Music" (WBAI), and more. He studied piano for many years with Dennis Malone at the Crestwood Music School.

Introducing yourself as a “composer" in the 21st century is a strange experience. For people outside of the concert music world, they often ask questions like, “Those still exist?” (we do) or “Aren’t composers dead?” (not all) or “Which instrument do you write for?” (more than one).  After decades of declining ticket sales and increasing isolation from general society, it makes sense that people are confused by my occupation. In this atmosphere, what is the future of classical music? Will it be seen as a beautiful, but antiquated art form, something that should be preserved like a painting in a museum? Or will it transform into something new, that remains current and changing, as it has in earlier eras?

In “Future Caprices”, I reflect on the future of concert music. I picture sounds that are engaging, beautiful, and challenging, with turns and changes that are as rapid as the world of instant gratification that it will inhabit. The piece is in one movement, divided into sections of mechanical, driving rhythms that contrast with nuanced, lyrical writing. Thank you, and I hope you enjoy the piece.



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ShoutHouse
Oct
23
7:00 PM19:00

ShoutHouse

ShoutHouse is an ensemble of musicians and dancers from hip-hop, classical, and jazz backgrounds. Called “incomparable to anything existing” by The Culture Trip, the group originally formed when members of an afrobeat/hip-hop band began collaborating with orchestral musicians. They aim to build understanding among different artistic communities through shared expression.

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Sandbox Percussion | James Ilgenfritz
Feb
20
7:00 PM19:00

Sandbox Percussion | James Ilgenfritz

Lauded by The Washington Post as “revitalizing the world of contemporary music” with “jaw- dropping virtuosity,” Sandbox Percussion has established themselves as a leading proponent in this generation of contemporary percussion chamber music. Brought together by their love of chamber music and the simple joy of playing together, Sandbox Percussion captivates audiences with performances that are both visually and aurally stunning. Through compelling collaborations with composers and performers, Jonathan Allen, Victor Caccese, Ian Rosenbaum and Terry Sweeney seek to engage a wider audience for classical music.

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Last season Sandbox Percussion presented 35 performances throughout the United States. During a tour through California they gave the world premiere of  Thomas Kotcheff’s percussion quartet not only that one but that one & that too, and were presented on the Festival of New American Music in Sacramento, CA. In collaboration with Ensemble HOWL they gave the world premiere of Amy Beth Kirsten’s Quixote at Montclair State University’s Peak Performances concert series. During the American Music Festival at the Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC) in Troy, NY, Sandbox gave the world premiere of a concerto by Viet Cuong entitled Re(new)al along with the Albany Symphony. During the festival they also gave a recital which featured works by American composers Steve Reich, Christopher Cerrone, and David Crowell.

In addition to keeping a busy concert schedule Sandbox has also participated in various masterclasses and coachings at schools such as the Peabody Conservatory, Curtis Institute, the University of Southern California, Kansas University, Cornell University, and Furman University. While there they coached students on some of the most pivotal works in the percussion repertoire including Steve Reich’s Drumming, György Ligeti’s, Síppal, dobbal, nádihegedüvel and John Cage’s Third Construction. These teaching experiences have inspired the quartet to pursue a role of pedagogy and mentorship for today’s young generation of musicians. This season Sandbox Percussion will present the second annual NYU Sandbox Percussion Seminar. This week long seminar invites percussion students from across the globe to rehearse and perform some of today’s leading percussion chamber music repertoire. A culminating performance is held at the iconic Brooklyn venue, National Sawdust.

Most recently has marked the quartet’s growing interest in composition. Last season Jonathan Allen’s Sonata and Victor Caccese’s A Part, Apart were featured on ten separate programs throughout the U.S. Sandbox also worked closely with composer David Crowell on a marimba arrangement of his saxophone sextet, Point Reyes. They gave the world premiere in November 2014 in Brooklyn, NY.

This season Sandbox will collaborate with The Industry, an opera company in Los Angeles, for the world premiere of Galileo, a 90-minute theatre piece by Andy Akiho. Other highlights will include a performance of Jerome Begin’s Wilderness in collaboration with the Brian Brooks Moving Company at Choregus Productions in Tulsa, OK, the first ever percussion quartet concert at the Cosmos Club in Washington, DC, a performance of Gyorgy Ligeti’s Síppal, dobbal, nádihegedüvel with mezzo-soprano Elspeth Davis at the Percussion Arts Society International Convention in Indianapolis, IN, and a second west coast tour including 11 performances from Seattle to Los Angeles. Sandbox Percussion endorses Pearl/Adams musical instruments, Vic Firth drumsticks and Remo drumheads.


Photo Credit: Peter Gannushkin

Photo Credit: Peter Gannushkin

Composer/bassist James Ilgenfritz leads The Anagram Ensemble, featured on his 2015 CD, the William Burroughs-inspired opera The Ticket That Exploded. He has performed throughout the US, Canada, the Czech Republic, Germany, Hungary, Indonesia, Italy, Poland, and Switzerland. He has worked with composer/improvisers Anthony Braxton, “Blue” Gene Tyranny, Pauline Oliveros, Roscoe Mitchell, Rufus Reid, John Zorn, and many others. His recent CD Origami Cosmos features works by Annie Gosfield, Miya Masaoka, Elliott Sharp, & JG Thirlwell. His trio Hypercolor (w/ Lukas Ligeti & Eyal Maoz) released their debut CD on John Zorn’s label Tzadik in January 2015. James has received grants from New Music USA and American Composers Forum.

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Julia Easterlin w/ Michael Sachs | Will Healy & George Meyer
Nov
7
7:00 PM19:00

Julia Easterlin w/ Michael Sachs | Will Healy & George Meyer

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Georgia-born, Brooklyn-based artist Julia Easterlin purls a modern Southern Gothic lament in new works from the album ‘Light of a Strange Day’. Through the language of baroque pop and Appalachian folk music, Easterlin and producer Shahzad Ismaily (Lou Reed, Karla Kihlstedt, Marc Ribot, Sam Amidon, etc.) bring to light a collection of new pieces John Schaefer of NPR Music calls, “at once lovely and unsettling… a striking debut.”

For Carnegie Hill Concerts, Easterlin will be performing a minimalist duo with composer and clarinetist Michael Sachs. The two met as students in Boston and have recently been collaborating in intimate performances featuring themselves, their instruments, and a single light bulb.


Will-Healy.jpg

Will Healy is a composer and pianist based in New York. Noted for his “lushly bluesy” sound and “adroitly blended… textures” (New York Times), he is the artistic director of ShoutHouse, an ensemble of 15 hip-hop, jazz, and classical musicians. After playing trumpet in an Afrobeat band for a few years, he grew interested in collaborating with performers from many corners of the New York music scene. In addition, he is an accomplished pianist specializing in Bach, with a repertoire that includes the complete Goldberg Variations and WTC Book 1. Recent awards include a Charles Ives Scholarship from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, an ASCAP Morton Gould Award, and prizes in the Juilliard and Kaleidoscope Orchestra Composition Competitions. Healy recently completed his M.M. at The Juilliard School, where he studied with Samuel Adler, John Corigliano, and Steven Stucky.


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Violinist and composer George Meyer has performed his own compositions at Chamber Music Northwest (Portland, Oregon), the Telluride and RockyGrass Bluegrass Festivals, and the Savannah Music Festival. in 2016 Ensemble Quodlibet premiered his Concerto Grosso for string quartet and orchestra in New york City. His other performances include those at the Rome Chamber and Aspen Music Festivals. He has appeared with his father Edgar Meyer and with Sam Bush, Jerry Douglas, and Mike Marshall. After graduating from Harvard in 2015 with an English degree, he began a master’s degree in violin at Juilliard in 2016.

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